How Small Groups in Churches Are Like Teams in Businesses

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Small Groups in Churches

I believe that businesses can learn SO much from churches that are run well. After all, these are organizations that inspire, train and empower dozens of (unpaid) volunteers. These volunteers are essential to the church fulfilling its vision and work for the greater good. Reaching people with the gospel. Churches lead people and get things done with “free” labor! Business owners can learn much by watching how church leaders motivate their unpaid volunteers.

Lets take a look at small groups, an emerging trend among growing churches over the past decade. They are called by many names: life groups, home groups, discipleship groups or Sunday School classes. The purpose and function remains the same: to engage the church body in smaller more intimate settings for spiritual growth, community outreach and personal relationships.

Small Groups cultivate fellowship, spiritual growth, and an empowered church membership. They are often the life-blood of a church’s culture. Church members are much more likely to stay if they are in a small group.

In fact, noted church researcher George Barna and Lifeway’s Thom Rainer combined their research to formulate the following in Rainer’s book, Surprising Insights from the Unchurched and Proven Ways to Reach Them:

Involvement in small groups, such as Sunday School, is key to assimilation… New Christians who immediately became active in Sunday School were five times more likely to remain in the church five years later than those who were active in worship services alone.

Teams in Business

As a business owner myself, I find a strong correlation between small groups in churches and teams – or pods – in business settings.

I’ve noticed that businesses that grow past about a dozen employees can begin to lose the small business feel. It’s just not possible for one business owner to be a CEO and also lead every team member. As you outgrow your ability to meet with and get to know each employee, a scalable team structure will allow you, as the owner, to influence each of your employees through the leadership efforts of other leaders in your organization.

Most business owners are looking for ways to create engagement among their staff members. By creating small teams or pods in your business, you can create natural opportunities for employees to feel more engaged in the operation and culture of the company. Setting up this structure will allow the business owner to lead the leaders (I’ll write more on that in an upcoming post.) and continue to build in scalable layers of leadership and mentoring as the business grows.

The end result of implementing teams or pods is customer satisfaction. How? Teams increase employee satisfaction by helping to foster relationships and a sense of community among employees. When employee satisfaction increases, employees stay longer creating continuity and a better experience for your customers.

Interested in ways to make teams work in your business or small groups thrive in your church? Stay tuned for my next blog post on small groups and how churches (and businesses) can keep their members engaged in them!